Atypical Realisms

December 05, 2015

 

 

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The world in one image

I want to show you how to do something a little different with your Infrared images.

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Some people call them Planets, Round pics, or Polar Planets.

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I came up with the phrase Atypical Realsims for a series I did a few years back.

Done right, they have an artsy look to them.

The steps involved in making one is not difficult, so let’s try it.

I’m going to start with image.

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I made this infrared image in  the Great Smoky Mountains with a Super Color converted Canon 7DMKII.  I balanced the levels, and swapped the Red and Blue color channels.

It’s nice, kinda basic,  . . .  kinda boring.

To start, I’m going to create a blank image in Photoshop

I’m going to create a blank image that is 10 inches by 10 inches at a resolution of  300 pixels/inch with a white background.

It is important that your new image is square, so that your finished  image will be completely round.

 

 

Then I will decide how much of the IR image I want to use for my finished image.  This is something you will want to try out on your image and adjust for your personal taste.  A panorama format tends to look best in the finished image. In this case I have an image that is about 10 inches by 2 inches and the resolution is 300 pixels/inch.

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Next drag the image into the New, White Canvas.

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Then select Image, Image rotation, Flip Canvas Vertical

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Now that the image is upside down, drag it to the top of the canvas.

8Win a FREE Camera Conversion! This is important; the image must be at the very top of the canvas.  You will also need to extend the image slightly off the sides on the left and right.

Select Filter, Distort, then Polar Coordinates

9Make certain that Rectangular to Polar is selected.

Then click OK.

If all the steps are followed, you should see your new Planet!

It may be small on the canvas.

If so, press ctrl +T, hold the shift key and drag the side of the image to make it larger.

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Finally, clean up the line in the image, using either the Healing Brush Tool  (bandaid) or the Clone Tool.  I also rotated the image.  Then to give it a slight 3D look, I added a beveled edge and shadow.

 

Here it is.

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So, what do you think?

Now it’s your turn.

There are more examples here.

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